Monthly Archives: January 2013

Halfway to Paradise – 50s and 60s rock photography at Scarborough Art Gallery

Are you a rock ‘n’ roller of a ‘certain age’? Did you see the big names in Scarborough in the 50s and 60s? If so, Scarborough Art Gallery would like to hear from you.

This spring, the Gallery is playing host to a touring exhibition of rock photographs from the Victoria and Albert, Museum, London’s. Halfway to Paradise: The Birth of British Rock comprises over 100 photographs by Harry Hammond from the V&A collection, capturing the emergence of British rock. Hammond (1920-2009) was the first great photographer of British rock ‘n’ roll. Starting in the late 1940s, he captured definitive images of virtually every leading British musician.

The exhibition features many of Hammond’s most famous images of leading British artists, including The Beatles, Cliff Richard and Shirley Bassey, as well as those of many visiting American artists including Buddy Holly and Little Richard.

The Gallery would like to enhance the collection with local memorabilia from the period, and is asking for local rock ‘n’ rol lveterans to come forward and lend their treasures.

“We’re looking for anything relating to the big artists of the period who played at Scarborough venues like the Futurist and the Spa,” says Scarborough Museums Trust Head of Collections Karen Snowden. “People might still have tickets, programmes, scrapbooks, or articles of clothing – we’d love to borrow them for Gallery visitors to enjoy when they visit the exhibition.”

Anyone who has items they would be willing to lend is asked to contact Karen on 01723 384506 or Karen.snowden@smtrust.uk.com

Halfway to Paradise: The Birth of British Rock can be seen at Scarborough Art Gallery from Saturday 9th March to Sunday 14th 2013.

As well as photos of artistes performing, it provides an insight into the wider music industry – Tin Pan Alley, recording studios, disc jockeys and TV shows such as Oh Boy! The photographs are set against a soundtrack of rock music from the 50s and the 60s.

Born in the East End of London, Hammond began his career as a promising society portrait photographer. During the Second World War Hammond served as a reconnaissance photographer with the RAF. On his return to London he found himself increasingly drawn to the music industry. Using his talent and professionalism as a portrait photographer he began to photograph a new breed of celebrity – the rock ‘n’ roll generation.

Hammond captured the liberal, post-war public attitude that embraced the popular music culture of rock ‘n’ roll and earned respect not only for the innovative way he shot their performances, but also for his respect of his sitters’ private lives. In 1952 New Musical Express (NME) magazine was relaunced and Hammond soon became its primary photographer, taking some of the most famous images of the era and setting the standard of pop photography for the following generations.

North York Moors Railway – February Half Term new updated timetable

Saturday 16th – Sunday 24th February 2013

It only feels 5 minutes ago that the kids were heading back to school after the Christmas holidays but the North Yorkshire Moors Railway is all set for February half term with a fun activity trail between Pickering and Grosmont.

With the help of Tracker Jack, the railway’s mascot visitors that complete the trail sheet will be in with a chance of winning one of 5 family vouchers to visit the railway again in 2013.

The North Yorkshire Moors Railway is also changing its Grosmont departures to provide a better service for its passengers with a 10:30 departure replacing the 16:30. Danielle Ramsey, Marketing Manager said “the change to the service will allow passengers from Grosmont to make the most of their day out  on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway by providing an earlier departure than the current 12:30 offered.”

The Railway’s station tea rooms will be open and it’s a perfect excuse to stop for a scone and a cup of Yorkshire Tea before travelling up and down the line.

From 13:00 every day during the February Half term take up the special afternoon discount of reduced fares with adults and seniors travelling for £12, children at £6 and a family of 2 adults and up to 4 children traveling for £24.

Trains run every day between 16 – 24 February 2013,  a full day Pickering to Grosmont/Goathland day rover costs Adults £17.00, Concessions £15.00, Children £8.50 and a Family of 2 adults and up to 4 children £34.00.

For more information, please call 01751 472508, book online www.nymr.co.uk, follow us on Twitter @NYMR or Facebook @North Yorkshire Moors Railway

Get stuffed in 2013 with a new selection of tasty Pullman Dining Train menus

Stop thinking about your diet and start thinking about the delicious food there is to sample on-board the North Yorkshire Moors Railway’s Pullman Dining Train.

The Pullman Dining Train season kicks off on 2nd March with the Moorlander Lunch menu a great way to beat those winter blues.

Gill Brown, Dining Train manager explains “we are delighted to be offering our dining guests even more choice in 2013 with new Italian and French menus and back once again our Murder Mystery dining train where our passengers are encouraged to get dressed up and take part in this dining and theatre experience.”

If the mouth-watering food and scenic journey through the North York Moors National Park wasn’t enough to tempt your taste buds, then the Railway is offering a free bottle of quality NYMR wine with any booking made before 31st January 2013, which might be enough to sweeten the deal.

Offer – Book before 31st January 2013 and receive a bottle of quality NYMR wine by calling 01751 472 508 or visiting customer services in Pickering Station.

For more information please call 01751 472508, book online www.nymr.co.uk or follow us on Twitter @NYMR and Facebook @North Yorkshire Moors Railway.

Yorkshire in bid to be European sculpture capital

Ambitious plans have been unveiled to make Yorkshire the sculpture capital of Europe.

This major new project is spearheaded by the Henry Moore Institute, The Hepworth Wakefield, Leeds Art Gallery and Yorkshire Sculpture Park.

With support from the Arts Council England and Welcome to Yorkshire, the four galleries will work together to create a unique offering for visitors.

The Yorkshire Sculpture Triangle will build on the county’s unique sculpture heritage as the birthplace of two of the most important 20th Century sculptors, Barbara Hepworth and Henry Moore.

Henry Moore, Three Pie#BE9EIt will encourage visitors to see sculpture at four outstanding venues which all offer free entry to world-class exhibitions and are visited by more than 1 million art lovers every year.

The project will also provide a boost to the tourism economy by signposting visitors to the great local hotels and impressive nearby restaurants dotted around the attractions.

Cluny Macpherson, Regional Director, Arts Council England said: “The Arts Council has invested significantly in several of the organisations involved in the Yorkshire Sculpture Triangle and I’m delighted that we can support a project which will attract further investment and visitors to Yorkshire. It is a great example of how partnership working can help more people to become familiar with Yorkshire’s pre-eminence in modern sculpture.”

Following the opening of The Hepworth Wakefield in 2011 the county now has four major sculpture venues all within a few miles of each other.

Yorkshire Sculpture Park, the first of its kind in the UK and the biggest in Europe, opened in 1977 and is now one of the UK’s premier art attractions. The park has continued to be popular since its creation; 2011 proved to be the best year in the sculpture park’s history with 350,000 visitors passing through its doors.

The Leeds Art Gallery has been a much loved cultural highlight in the heart of the city for over a century, with visitor figures now pushing half a million a year. The gallery’s fabulous art collection is designated by the Government as being of national and international importance and it is particularly strong in the area of twentieth century sculpture including works by Moore, Hepworth and Gormley.

Linked to Leeds Art Gallery by a glass bridge, the Henry Moore Institute is not only an impressive art gallery but maintains a reputation as a world-leading centre for the study of sculpture. It is part of The Henry Moore Foundation, which was set up by the artist in 1977 and is now one of the UK’s leading arts charities.  Hosting temporary exhibitions ranging from ancient to contemporary sculpture, the Institute also has a unique sculpture library which is open to members of the public and scholars alike.

The newly opened The Hepworth Wakefield is named after one of the city’s most famous former residents, artist Barbara Hepworth. Opened in early 2011 as the largest new gallery outside London, the initial target of 150,000 visitors in the first year of operation was smashed when this many people visited in the first few weeks. By the end of the year over half a million people had passed through its doors, three times the number expected, putting it firmly in the top 3 most visited galleries in Britain.

Henry Moore, Three Piece Reclining Figure No. 1, 1961-2. Reproduced by permission of The Henry Moore Foundation. Photo Jonty WildeGary Verity chief executive of Welcome to Yorkshire believes the secret will be to not only showcase the cultural attractions but to also signpost visitors to the terrific selection of hotels, bars and restaurants surrounding them.

He said: “We will be highlighting how to get to Yorkshire, how to travel from gallery to gallery as well as signposting visitors towards the great places to stay and impressive places to eat. We will make it easy for those tempted, to come to Yorkshire and see some of the best sculpture in the world.”

There will be an impressive programme for 2013 including; The Henry Moore Institute which will exhibit sculptures by Dennis Oppenheim featuring fireworks and flares. Leeds Art Gallery will be home to the prestigious Northern Art Prize, Yorkshire Sculpture Park will host the biggest UK exhibition to date by British-Nigerian artist Yinka Shonibare MBE and

The Hepworth Wakefield will present the UK premier of a dynamic new performance piece by artist Linder Sterling. It will include collaborations with Northern Ballet, British fashion designer Pam Hogg, and musician Stuart McCallum.

A major TV and high-profile marketing campaign will promote the Yorkshire Sculpture Triangle with new brochures and a website to attract visitors and spread the word.

People are urged to visit the Yorkshire Sculpture Triangle website www.Ysculpture.co.uk; follow on Twitter @Ysculpture and #Ysculpture and like on Facebook at www.facebook.com/YorkshireSculptureTriangle.

Apple Remote App not working with Apple TV?

Apple Remote App not working with Apple TV?

We had this very issue this week!

The trusty iPad could throw YouTube clips to the Apple TV but we could not use it to control the Apple TV itself using the Apple Remote App.

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Strange goings on

Answer, we had used the wired only connection to connect the Apple TV to the network (naturally we thought this would result in a faster more reliable connection), when we made the Apple TV use the wireless network the problem went away. Strange!!!