Monthly Archives: May 2011

Domesday Reloaded (Scarborough 1986)

“In 1986, 900 years after William the Conqueror’s original Domesday Book, the BBC published the Domesday Project. The project was probably the most ambitious attempt ever to capture the essence of life in the United Kingdom. Over a million people contributed to this digital snapshot of the country.

People were asked to record what they thought would be of interest in another 1000 years. ”

This has now been adapted and a current more up-to-date version is in the works.

For example the Open Air Theatre
Open Air Theatre

Or information on New Town Developments:
“The alteration of the main street banning traffic and paving the road is the most significant recent development. The old road was paved in the first half of 1984 by the council  workmen, and the area has been decorated with flower tubs, trees and  wooden seats leaving room for early  morning delivery vehicles. There are a wide variety of shops, supermarkets,  banks and building societies. The largest shop is Marks and Spencer which itself has been extended and  modernised. The precinct attracts a variety of buskers including a saxaphone player, a pianist and a  several bands who  perform during festivals. A recent development on the South Bay is an amusement complex,  called The Olympia, containing fast  food outlets, bumper cars, waltzers, a medieval village and a pub.”

Health & Fitness in the news – 16/05/2011

Exercise and Industry

1. Government claims stats show Swapathon success – Marketing Week

The Government hit almost 80% of its target to encourage 1 million healthy swaps as part of its Great New Year Swapathon, according to the Department of Health.
Marketing Week

2. Andrew Lansley’s NHS reforms are unworkable, says review chief – The Guardian

Steve Field, the GP appointed to head the NHS listening exercise, warns that key services could be destroyed. The senior doctor called in by David Cameron to review the government’s health reforms has dismissed them as unworkable and “destabilising” in provisional conclusions that could fatally undermine the plans.
The Guardian

3. Department of Health delays business plan release – MSN News

Fresh uncertainty surrounds the coalition’s NHS reforms after the Department of Health’s business plan was delayed. While other Whitehall departments have published updated details of their intentions for the next four years, the DoH will not release any information until a “listening exercise” on the controversial shake-up is complete.
MSN News

Health and Lifestyle

1. Exercise to beat depression – Womens Fitness Magazine

We all know that regular exercise pumps us full of endorphins, making us feel happier, but new research has shown that it can be as effective in treating depression as medication.
Womens Fitness Magasine

Health & Fitness in the news – 13/05/2011

Exercise and Industry

1. Tories blasted for charging kids to use public playground – The Mirror

Mean- minded Tory councillors were blasted yesterday for charging children to use a public playground. Town hall chiefs in Conservative-run Wandsworth, South London, are demanding that youngsters between five and 16 cough up £2.50 a head for access to the swings and roundabouts.
The Mirror

2. Children ‘risking heart disease’ by not exercising – The Telegraph

Researchers who looked at 223 children, whose average age was just under 10, found that those who exercised the least had more body fat and a higher resting pulse rate than those who exercised the most. Girls in particular could be jeopardising their future health by not exercising sufficiently, they discovered.
The Telegraph

Health and Lifestyle

1. New arthritis drug given green light – The Telegraph

Those with moderate to severe RA will now be able to get Simponi, the brand name of the drug golimumab, in some situations where similar treatments have not worked.
The Telegraph

North Bay Railway & Peasholm

North Bay Railway around 2.5 miles from the Crown Spa Hotel, just walk round the North Marine Drive that you can see tailing off round the back of the lighthouse, when looking down to the South Bay from in front of the Hotel. Date visited Easter 2011.

Trip suitable for all the family (disabled access available) If your youngsters are ‘train obsessed’ like mine, then this trip is for you…

North Bay Railway have been operating trains since 1931, taking passengers from Peasholm Park to Scalby Mills stations, offering beautiful views of Scarborough’s North Bay.

North Bay Railway Things to Do in Scarborough

Toot-Toot Train Entering the Station!

The line operated by the North Bay Railway Company Ltd, offers a wide range of attractions as well as the railway, including the Glass House Bistro, Boating Lake and Historic Water Chute. Glass House cafe is opposite the train station: opening times 10am-4.30pm Mon-Fri Sat sun 10am-5. 

Children’s events take place throughout the year including Santa Specials, Themed Weekends, (Teddy Bear’s Express, Hallow screen) Xmas Santa express they are also open every weekend and daily from the 2nd of April onwards

Glass House Cafe

Nice place for a break and a Rest, sitdown and relax.

 

 

 

First train: 11:00am mid week and 10:30am at Weekends & Peak Times.

When:
On the hour and xx.30 from Peasholm Park and xx.15 and xx.45 from Scalby Mills. At peak times, every 15 minutes

Until: 4:00pm

Child Single £2.00

Adults Single £2.60

Child Return £2.50

Adult Return £3.10

Prices at the lovely Glass house, just opposite the train station, vary from £4.95 for a baguette, cakes from £2.60, main meals £7.25, and £1.60 tea, or large cappuccino £2.25 and cold drinks from £1.80.

Health & Fitness in the news – 11/05/2011

Exercise and Industry

1. Anti-terror drill goes ahead at 2012 Olympic Village – London Evening Standard

An anti-terrorism exercise was carried out at the London Olympics Village, police confirmed. The drill, staged over three days at the accommodation complex, involved the Metropolitan Police, other emergency services and the Ministry of Defence (MoD).
London Evening Standard

Health and Lifestyle

1. Are Coffee Drinkers Less Prone to Aggressive Breast Cancer? – Health Finder

Women who drink a substantial amount of coffee each day may lower their risk for developing a particular type of breast cancer, Swedish researchers say. Their study linked consumption of five or more cups of coffee a day to a relatively marked reduction in the non-hormone-responsive disease known as ER-negative breast cancer. However, coffee consumption did not appear to lower the risk for developing ER-positive breast cancer, a hormone-responsive estrogen receptor form of the disease.
Health Finder

2. Paracetamol ‘link’ to blood cancer – The Telegraph

Scientists say people over 50 who take the painkiller on most days of the week are increasing their chance of getting blood cancer over a 10-year period from about one to two per cent. Researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre in Seattle drew their conclusions after following nearly 65,000 initially healthy older men and women from across Washington State over an average of six years.
The Telegraph

3.   Finger length clue to motor neurone disease –  BBC News

Researchers measured the finger length of 110 people, including 47 with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the most common form of the disease. The study, in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, suggests a link between a longer fourth finger relative to the index finger and ALS.
BBC News

Health & Fitness in the news – 10/05/11

Exercise and Industry

1. Work out and help the heroes – Women Fitness Blog

In a bid to raise money for Help The Heroes charity, Gym for Heroes will be challenging the public to take part in UK’s largest physical activity based endurance contest.
Women Fitness Blog

2. Drug trial to prevent obese kids – BBC News

Obese pregnant women are to be given a drug to reduce the risk of obesity in their children as part of an NHS trial. Overweight women supply too much food to a growing baby which can lead to health problems for mother and child. UK doctors want to try to control this with metformin, which is used to treat diabetes. Weight Concern said it was an intriguing idea, but ideally women should reach a normal weight before pregnancy.
BBC News

Health and Lifestyle

1. Breastfed children are better behaved – The Telegraph

Researchers have found that those who are breastfed for at least four months as babies are 30 per cent less likely to exhibit a range of behavioural problems when they start school. Such problems include anxiety, clinginess, bad behaviour such as lying and stealing, as well as being hyperactive. Critics of such studies, which many fear stigmatise those who do not breastfeed, say that mothers that do tend to be older, better educated and better off.
The Telegraph

2. Ask the doctor: Could a jab stop my bones crumbling? – Daily Mail

First let me reassure you that your treatment to date has been absolutely correct. Osteoporosis affects bone density — if healthy bone is like a block of wood, bone affected by osteoporosis is like white foam polystyrene (the sort used as packing material) and is so much easier to snap or crush.
Daily Mail

Electricity conservation and the energy crisis

Much of the focus on the energy crisis in the UK has been upon the cars we drive, and with good reason. Cars burn fossil fuels, creating smog consisting of greenhouse gasses, which then traps the heat of the sun and warms the environment. This causes global warming, which is a very real threat to our continued well-being as a species.

 But you shouldn’t just focus on your car. Energy conservation at home can help play a part in the energy crisis, and electricity conservation can also put a few pounds in your pocket at the end of every month.

 I always remember learning this basic fact that, for each degree you lower your heat during the winter, your heating bill will be roughly 3% less. An added bonus of running cooler in winter is that you don’t feel the cold as much and you burn up to 100 more calories a day, without any effort.

 This applies in the summer as well, with the preponderance of air conditioners from DIY outlets going full blast morning, noon and night. When it comes to electricity conservation, it’s a year-round concern.

Why? Well,the risk of global warming is a real threat that could have devastating consequences.

 The following is from wikipedia.org’s entry on the subject:

 Global warming is the increase in the average temperature of the Earth’s near-surface air and oceans since the mid-20th century and its projected continuation. Global surface temperature increased during the last century. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concludes that increasing greenhouse gas concentrations resulting from human activity such as fossil fuel burning and deforestation caused most of the observed temperature increase since the middle of the 20th century. The IPCC also concludes that variations in natural phenomena such as solar radiation and volcanoes produced most of the warming from pre-industrial times to 1950 and had a small cooling effect afterward. These basic conclusions have been endorsed by more than 40 scientific societies and academies of science,[B] including all of the national academies of science of the major industrialized countries. A small number of scientists dispute the consensus view.

 Climate model projections summarized in the latest IPCC report indicate that the global surface temperature will probably rise further during the twenty-first century. The uncertainty in this estimate arises from the use of models with differing sensitivity to greenhouse gas concentrations and the use of differing estimates of future greenhouse gas emissions. Some other uncertainties include how warming and related changes will vary from region to region around the globe. Most studies focus on the period up to the year 2100. However, warming is expected to continue beyond 2100 even if emissions stop, because of the large heat capacity of the oceans and the long lifetime of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

 An increase in global temperature will cause sea levels to rise and will change the amount and pattern of precipitation, probably including expansion of subtropical deserts. The continuing retreat of glaciers, permafrost and sea ice is expected, with warming being strongest in the Arctic. Other likely effects include increases in the intensity of extreme weather events, species extinctions, and changes in agricultural yields.

 But even if you drive is not to combat global warming, being energy efficient means you can have more money for those “rainy days” that can catch us out once in a while.